Top 5 weekend stories you may have missed: Photography company could face legal action, Fargo Sports Complex needs big donation to continue construction – INFORUM

Horace City Administrator Brent Holper and Mayor Kory Peterson have watched the city grow at a rapid pace. Here they stand on the main street that divides the town. David Samson / The Forum

FARGO — A Fargo man who was blinded in one eye after being shot with pepper balls by police during a 2019 confrontation has settled his federal lawsuit with the city.
U.S. District of North Dakota Judge Peter Welte approved on Monday, Oct. 4, a request by Tyler Alexander Patel, 29, and the City of Fargo to dismiss Patel’s civil rights suit. Patel will be paid $75,000, according to a settlement agreement obtained by The Forum from the city through an open records request.
The money Patel will receive will come from the North Dakota Insurance Reserve Fund. Political subdivisions use taxpayer money to pay dues to the fund, which is then used to defend against lawsuits.
The defendants do not admit fault, the settlement said.
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Newlyweds Kendall and Alexis Christianson are looking for answers after photography company Glasser Images abruptly closed, leaving them without their wedding pictures.
Newlyweds Kendall and Alexis Christianson are looking for answers after photography company Glasser Images abruptly closed, leaving them without their wedding pictures.Submitted photo

BISMARCK — Regional photography company, Glasser Images, is suddenly closing its doors — leaving clients and employees stunned – without their pictures – and out thousands of dollars.
Dozens of couples say they are being told they won’t get refunds for their wedding pictures either.
It was the moment they spent more than a year planning. Kendall and Alexis Christianson getting married in front of their North Dakota friends and family in mid-September.
They paid thousands of dollars to Glasser Images for professional wedding pictures and video, saying no red flags came up at first.
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North Dakota State University President Dean Bresciani gives his final state of the university speech Friday, Oct. 8, at the school. Submitted Photo
North Dakota State University President Dean Bresciani gives his final state of the university speech Friday, Oct. 8, at the school. Submitted Photo

FARGO — North Dakota State University President Dean Bresciani announced Friday, Oct. 8, that he will leave his estate to the school.
The announcement came during what Bresciani called his last state of the university address. The president who has led the school since 2010 said the power of higher education, and particularly NDSU, has transformed him and others.
“That realization has led me to think about how I could pay it back to NDSU,” he said during the speech. “I have concluded that I can’t ever do enough. I have concluded I can only do everything I possibly can. That is why I recently documented that my entire estate will be left to NDSU.”
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A conceptual draft for the volleyball portion of a proposed south Fargo sports complex.  Contributed by Fargo Park District
A conceptual draft for the volleyball portion of a proposed south Fargo sports complex. Contributed by Fargo Park District

FARGO — Fargo Park Board members believe they have the community support needed to construct a new multimillion dollar indoor sports complex in southwest Fargo, but more private funds are needed as they aim for at least a 50-50 split on the cost of the estimated $80.2 million facility.
The newly revised $80.2 million figure would include all construction, architectural and engineering fees, contingencies and other possible costs and was finalized late last month after consultations with design and construction partners.
As it stands, just over $22 million in private donations have been raised, but another $18 million to $20 million is still being sought.
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Horace City Administrator Brent Holper and Mayor Kory Peterson have watched the city grow at a rapid pace. Here they stand on the main street that divides the town. David Samson / The Forum
Horace City Administrator Brent Holper and Mayor Kory Peterson have watched the city grow at a rapid pace. Here they stand on the main street that divides the town. David Samson / The Forum

HORACE — When Horace Mayor Kory Peterson asked residents in a series of town meetings about five years ago to describe the city's identity, the most common response was "sleepy."
But the bedroom community on the southside of Fargo and West Fargo isn't very sleepy anymore, as rapid growth continues to bring the three cities closer together.
John Maness, a sales executive who moved to Horace in mid-August and has already joined the volunteer fire department, said he wanted to live in a community with a small town feel with lower taxes and less traffic.
Some who have lived in town much longer than Maness don't quite see it that way anymore.
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