f/7 'Awakenings': Area photographers reveal their art | Vermont Arts | rutlandherald.com – Rutland Herald

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Overcast. High 43F. Winds S at 5 to 10 mph..
Evening light rain followed by a mix of rain and snow showers overnight. Low 34F. Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of precip 80%.
Updated: November 14, 2021 @ 12:03 pm
Photos by Lisa Dimondstein
Julie Parker: “Luna Moth”
Elliot Burg: “A Cappella” (Myra Flynn)
Sandra Shenk: “Dawn over Bosque”

Photos by Lisa Dimondstein
Julie Parker: “Luna Moth”
Elliot Burg: “A Cappella” (Myra Flynn)
Sandra Shenk: “Dawn over Bosque”
Wings blurred and heads outstretched, a flock of birds flies through the early morning sky, their paths and bodies aligned with peach colored bands of clouds. A young Black woman in an army jacket, American flag over her shoulders, gazes at a distant point, her expression reflective as she stands amidst the crowd at a historic moment in time. Water cascades over rocks and between fantastic formations of nature sculpted ice as spring breaks loose.
In the sanctuary of the Waterbury Congregational Church, six photographers explore the theme of “Awakenings” in an exhibition that runs to Nov. 29. An opening reception will be held 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14.
The six photographers, all from central Vermont, are the members of the f/7 creative group. Named for a frequently used photography ratio of a camera’s focal length to the diameter of the aperture, f/7 organized in 2013. The photographers came together to share ideas and perspectives, critique and support each other’s work, and stretch their artistic horizons.
At monthly meetings, they bring new work exploring assigned themes — shadows, exuberance, magical, among recent ones. They give each other feedback and share technical and technique tips.
“There’s a lot of talent in the group, it’s very diverse. That diversity lays out every time we meet,” explained Elliot Burg whose focus in his photography is people — especially candid photographs and moments of people in action.
“I know that all the sets of photographs that people in f/7 bring to the table are going to be very different and creative. People are very good about giving constructive criticism and bringing different artistic values to the fore, ” Burg said.
The sanctuary of Waterbury Congregational Church is a lovely space for art with its wide panels of wall between handsome tall stained glass windows. The church community has been inviting artists to exhibit there since 2014.
The church is not only a beautiful setting, it also offers connections between the aesthetic experience of worship and art as aesthetic experience, noted Reverend Peter Plagge.
“The theme of ‘Awakenings’ was chosen for the show back in June,” added Sandra Shenk, who focuses on nature in much of her work. “We were all vaccinated. We didn’t have a hint of the Delta variant of COVID yet. We were all feeling a sense of awakening.”
Each photographer has three pieces in the exhibition.
Shenk’s photograph of birds flying at daybreak is accompanied by two images, each a leafless branch over a watercolor-like background of yellows and oranges. Their glow evokes a sense of springtime sun.
“I’ve seen photographs of birds where you really have a sense of their movement so I took that at a slow speed and kind of panned. It feels like awakening for me,” she says of her avian dawn
Rob Spring, the black and white photography expert of the group, also considers spring awakenings. Water flows over rocks and amidst glasslike ice structures. His ice is caught in the moment as solid sculpture, but in transition with the season.
“I have found no place that coalesces the natural and human worlds as seamlessly and with as much respect and beauty as Vermont,” Spring says in his artist’s statement.
“I am particularly drawn to snow-covered streams. As spring approaches, the streams begin to awaken with visible water flow allowing me to capture the interface of snow, ice and water.”
Julie Parker’s “Luna Moth,” magnified perhaps 10 times its original size, floats in multiple images through three vertical panels. The exquisite details of the moth’s form are amplified, allowing the viewer to see the tidy geometry of the comb-like hairs on its antennae through its veined translucent wings with faux eyes. Through Parker’s composition with multiple images of the lepidopteran insect, it seems to take flight — wings outstretched and hindwing tails trailing.
“Awakening to connections” is the focus of Lisa Dimondstein’s three pairs of photographs. Each includes an image of a spring flower and one of a dancer. A flower bud pairs with the dancer donning her pointe shoes. In another, the curve of stem and lines of petals in a breeze echo the dancer’s posture, long arms, and diaphanous dress.
Annie Tiberio considers “Awakening to new worlds of possibility and hope” in her photographs of wildflowers developed through multiple exposures.
“Creating art through photography has been a lifetime affair. I see an invisible image in my mind’s eye and endeavor to express it artistically through my camera and lenses,” Tiberio said.
Burg considered the theme of awakening through song and action. Two of his images are from the Women’s Marches in Washington in 2017 and 2018, and one of musician Myra Flynn singing in Middlesex.
Regarding his subject wrapped in the flag, photographed in 2017, Burg noted, “credit goes to the young woman whom I don’t know, for being who she was. Those kinds of presentations were really important at that march, standing up for what was right. It was the first demonstration when people were awakening to present a different point of view than those that prevailed in the 2016 election. People were awakening through action,” Burg said.
[email protected]
[email protected]

“Awakenings,” photographs by members of f/7 central Vermont photography group, are on exhibit through Nov. 29 at Waterbury Congregational Church, 8 N. Main St. in Waterbury. Hours are: 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday (enter through side door). An opening reception will be held 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14.
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